Which one is better? To sew or to seal.

To sew or to seal is a question that some fabricators have answered by gearing their offerings toward products that utilize either the former or the latter, but not both. While this kind of specialization can be a viable and lucrative strategy, expanding the toolbox to incorporate both sewing and sealing can often prove even more profitable—under the right conditions.
There’s good reason to consider doing so, says Steven Kaplan, president of S. Kaplan Sewing Machine Co. Inc. Headquartered in Newark, N.J., the company is a worldwide distributer of heavy-duty sewing machines to non-apparel industries.

But without adequate planning and preparation, the endeavor to become more versatile can backfire, resulting in businesses taking on expenses that don’t end up bringing in a good return on investment (ROI), especially if they have to hire more workers. Offering both can also mean entering somewhat unfamiliar manufacturing territory, leading to possible product failures; for example, when an item should have been sewn but was sealed instead, or vice versa. Evaluating, purchasing and learning to operate
Many realities factor into the decision about whether it makes sense to add sewing or sealing to your menu of services. One of these is the kind of projects you anticipate attracting by doing so. For example, says Evling, welded seams, rather than sewn, are typically superior for products that must be water -or tair-tight. They’re also likely the best route for medical applications involving antimicrobial requirements. Products destined for extreme weather are also good candidates for welding, she says, as thread might be prone to degradation under particularly harsh conditions.

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In fact, a welded seam can be stronger at the seam than the one-ply material itself, While many threads are very strong today, the fact that the material must be punctured in a sewing process makes it weaker at each stitch point.”
On the other hand, materials requiring a stretch at the seam might be better sewn, since a welded seam won’t stretch.
Purchase costs are generally less for sewing machines. But sewing equipment can generate other expenses, such as thread. Labor is also a consideration, although this depends on the machine.

Automated sewing and welding solutions don’t require a skilled operator, so labor costs can be reduced with these machines. Manual sewing typically carries the highest long-term labor costs. But one thing to consider is maintenance. Sewing machines require consistent maintenance and adjustment to keep the machine running properly.
If a sewing machine breaks down, specialized services are typically necessary to get it back up and running, which can affect production. However, sealing solutions need much less attention, perhaps requiring servicing once a year or so, which can usually be managed in-house at a time when production won’t be affected.
In fact, a welded seam can be stronger at the seam than the one-ply material itself. While many threads are very strong today, the fact that the material must be punctured in a sewing process makes it weaker at each stitch point.
On the other hand, materials requiring a stretch at the seam might be better sewn, since a welded seam won’t stretch.

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Post time: Jun-11-2022